Israel will start tracking the phones of citizens to determine who has been in contact with those infected with coronavirus

Israel will start tracking the phones of citizens to determine who has been in contact with those infected with coronavirus

Coronavirus in Israel: Police use spying tech to track patients | DW News

The Government of Israel has authorized the Service security country (Shabak) use mass surveillance of residents’ mobile phones to track their movements and identify those who have been in contact with those infected.

At the local police and the Ministry of Health already there are similar monitoring tools, but due to the rapid spread of the virus, the authorities decided to tighten control over compliance with quarantine measures. Now counterintelligence will be able use data about connecting devices to cell towers to determine the movement of patients and calculate with whom they interacted in recent days.

Shabak will be transfer this information to the Ministry of Health, which organizes the distribution of messages to everyone who was at a distance of less than two meters from the infected person more 10 minutes, with instructions to go through quarantine. After of this collected data will be retire.

Continuous Surveillance Activation Plan all still pending approval of the secret services subcommittee.

The Government of Israel assures that this is only temporary measures to combat the pandemic, and counterintelligence will receive only limited access to metadata, but critics are sounding the alarm. According to their words, such methods directly violate privacy and civil liberties, and may lead to the use of infrastructure for organizing secret surveillance of the population in real time.

Israel will start tracking the phones of citizens to determine who has been in contact with those infected with coronavirus

Human rights defenders fear that this practice can extend to others states at least time outbreak of coronavirus.

We also previously reported on Tom, what in Chinese elevators and hospitals began install holographic panels to avoid physical contact with buttons.

text: Ilya Bauer, a photo: Getty Images

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